Author Topic: Bowsprit  (Read 2913 times)

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Bowsprit
« on: April 07, 2014, 11:49:20 AM »
martin Cartwright
   
Posted on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 06:38 pm:      
For some time I have been concerned by the standard bowsprit fixing, as:-
1. I felt that it was very difficult to establish if the pin through the bowsprit stem was taking too much pressure, ie If I had correctly tightened the bobstay and forestay.
2.I also felt that it was a shame to have drilled a hole straight through the bowsprit as this must weaken the spar.
3.Removing the bowsprit is difficult and I thought it would be good to have a retractable one.(Anchoring, Marina mooring).
I was lucky enough to find a second hand stainless collar (5) so I had a larger diameter length of stainless studding welded onto it and bolted this through the stem as a permanent fixture. I also slightly modified the foredeck cleat (taking the heel of the bowsprit) so that it can easily be removed to retract the bowsprit.
Not for everyone I know! But I enjoyed doing it and took the opportunity to lengthen the bowsprit (a section of an old boom a yard in Woodbridge was getting rid of)so that the rig is better balanced when sailing with the mizzen (I hope!)

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2014, 11:49:38 AM »
David Cawston
   
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 08:08 pm:      
I am in the process of repainting the mast and bowsprit with Deks Olja and whilst rubbing down the bowsprit I found a 1 inch long split going vertically from the hole through the bowsprit where it presses up against the stempost. I would not have noticed it with the bowsprit in place. I hope the glue I use will hold it together.
Any chance of a photo please Martin of your mod to the foredeck cleat? Loosing that extra length by pulling in the bowsprit would save a bob or two when we visit Torquay Marina in late May this year.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2014, 11:51:11 AM »
martin cartwright
   
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 01:48 pm:      
I found that the original stainless studding 'pin' on mine was bent when I took it out!The mod is very simple:- I put a nut on the top side of the existing threaded stainless studding to hold it in place and then replaced the cleat (countersunk on the underside so it fits flush). I then fastened it with stainless 'rings'(I am not sure what the proper name for them is , but you can get them from any chandlers). You could re-use the existing bronze domed head nuts, but I wanted it to be removable by hand and the 'rings' also double up to hold the bowsprit in the retracted position.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2014, 11:51:31 AM »
martin cartwright
   
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 01:44 pm:      
One point to watch out for with the above arrangement which I have just realised. Because the bowsprit is no longer pinned to the stempost there is nothing to prevent it from pulling out forwards except the pressure on the bobstay. This will not be a problem when the mast is up, but when the mast is down I suppose it is theoretically possible (although only with a slack bobstay) for it to pull out.
I have fitted bowsprit shrouds (to support a longer bowsprit), but if you don't have these you could tie a length of rope from the bowsprit cranse iron along the bowsprit to the cleat, to be absolutely safe.Alternatively you could put a small pin throught the cleat and through the foot of the bowsprit.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2014, 11:51:47 AM »

David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 11:11 pm:      
Today, with the help of a friend with lots of woodworking tools, I have made a new bowsprit out of a 3"x3" square length of Douglas fir. I have left it square aft of the stempost and gradually reduced it to circular at the outer end. It is so much stiffer/stronger than the original. All that remains to be done is a final sanding, then Deks-Oljeing and finally modifying the cutout in the bulwark. Hopefully, weather permitting (am I tempting fate by saying that after Easter's miserable weather) we will try it out with a quick trip to Windermere in 2 weeks time.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2014, 11:52:04 AM »

David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 07:34 pm:      
Fitted the new bowsprit today, just got to finish off cutting a larger hole in the bulwark, screw on fittings for roller reefing and Deks-Olye. I noticed the foredeck was rising/flexing in the cleat area as I pulled down on the nose of the bowsprit to fit the bobstay. Has anyone else noticed this. With the mast raised I do not think there is a real problem. Similarly, when I tighten my running forestay the whole foredeck sinks a little. Which takes us back to the subject of internal mast supports.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2014, 11:52:23 AM »

David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 07:34 pm:      
Fitted the new bowsprit today, just got to finish off cutting a larger hole in the bulwark, screw on fittings for roller reefing and Deks-Olye. I noticed the foredeck was rising/flexing in the cleat area as I pulled down on the nose of the bowsprit to fit the bobstay. Has anyone else noticed this. With the mast raised I do not think there is a real problem. Similarly, when I tighten my running forestay the whole foredeck sinks a little. Which takes us back to the subject of internal mast supports.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2014, 11:53:04 AM »

Adrian Evans
Username: Adrian_evans

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Friday, May 02, 2008 - 02:13 pm:      
Of course, every material has to deflect to some degree in order to resist the force that is imposed on it. It becomes alarming when the deflection is visible, and we do not know the limits of its elasticity, the point at which it stops deforming elasticly and starts to permenantly deform, (bend, tear, stretch etc., sometimes very rapidly and catastrophicly!) I have completed all the structural repair to Peggoty's front deck, and am convinced that it is more rigid than before. This is mostly, I think, because I have seamed the joint between deck and hull with GRP, where some of the rivets had pulled out, and this continuous joint has made the hull and the deck act structurally as one strong three dimensional shape, the curve in each strengthening the other. The additional layers (+6)of woven roving and CSM have of course thickened the deck, making it more resistant to deflection as well.
I would also say that when I initially surveyed the damage, I was impressed at how much some parts of the deck must have deflected without any signs of damage, and I did look very carefully for any flaking or delamination.

This I found very reassuring, and I would think that it would not be a difficult job to seam much of the hull to deck joint within the cabin area, until you get to the quarter berths.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2014, 11:53:20 AM »

Pam Freeman
Username: Pam_freeman

Registered: 05-2011
   
Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 03:51 pm:      
A generalised query here - and from a green-eyed monster who's really jealous of all of you and your WBs - i.e. I don't have one... YET!!
What are your thoughts about sailing with a jib attached to, say, a fitting direct to the stem itself and not using the 'sprit at all.

Am just interested...!

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2014, 11:53:46 AM »

Phil Shimmin
Username: Philshimmin

Registered: 11-2010
   
Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 06:51 pm:      
I'll jump in before the rest... its all about balance, the sprit enables the mast to be set further forward, and larger canvas areas to be carried.... So get rid of your sprit, reduce the foresail and the mainsail areas, slow down in the water and hold tight on to the tiller!

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2014, 11:54:08 AM »
Martin_cartwright
Username: Martin_cartwright

Registered: 04-2008
   
Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 08:48 pm:      
I agree with Phil. I have tried sailing with just a staysail (attached close to the stem) and mainsail and it doesn't work - not even in high winds.There isn't enough sail forward of the mast.
Furthermore, in my experience you need all of the jib sail area all the time, even in high winds with the main reefed right down. Consequently, I have done away with my jib's roller reefing (as I never used it)in favour of roller furling.
I would be interested to hear if anyone has sailed successfully with a reefed jib.

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2014, 11:54:25 AM »

David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2011 - 03:31 pm:      
I have always thought the jib to be undersized (or the bowsprit is not long enough) in light airs as there is always a weather helm. Phil and Martin have said it all, it is all about balance and when it is necessary to have a double reef in the main, with full jib Markie is perfectly balanced on the helm, finger-tip light. It is just a shame that with a double reef, or even a single, progress to windward is painfully slow. I prefer to sail unreefed and spill some wind, a bit hair-raising at times (David Owens will agree after our sailing last year at Milford Haven).

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2014, 11:54:50 AM »
Pam Freeman
Username: Pam_freeman

Registered: 05-2011
   
Posted on Friday, May 20, 2011 - 03:51 pm:      
Phil, Martin and David: I've just looked in and I'm thrilled with your answers. Thank you so much. You see, it really does pay to "ask others"... and on this occasion, bearing in mind your helpful answers, I'm jolly glad I didn't try it ... all on my own; I'd have got in a right pickle and I don't think I'll be coming up with silly ideas like that one again! Everything makes so much sense - and as said above, THANK YOU.
I'll carry on dreaming - that one day a Winkle Brig will be MINE!

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Re: Bowsprit
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2014, 11:55:09 AM »
George Billington
Username: George_billington

Registered: 12-2009
   
Posted on Sunday, May 22, 2011 - 04:11 pm:      
Hi Pam, One other thing to remember, the Bowsprit allows the angle between the Mast and the Forestay to be larger, thereby putting less of a strain on the rigging. It's a bit like the Spreaders on a Bermudan rigged mast, to gain stiffness in the rigging, with less strain and thinner stays, thus improving boat tuning - Mind you, we are talking about a Winklebrig, so maybe the tuning bit is OTT?