Author Topic: Tabernacle  (Read 3287 times)

Clint

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Tabernacle
« on: May 18, 2014, 01:28:04 PM »
I have just removed the mast tabernacle, was going to start stripping it for new varnish etc, bit on seeing the condition of it, it look like it needs to be rebuilt from scratch. What are the thoughts on this? What would the best wood be to replace it?

Clint

Paul Thomas

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2014, 07:52:03 PM »
Stainless steel.

Clint

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2014, 08:16:33 PM »
I did think about stainless as l was stripping the paint off, besides being virtually indestructable, wont stainless be hugely expensive?

Paul Thomas

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2014, 12:12:04 PM »
I just saw one that had been made for a Lune Whammel that was for sale recently, and thought it looked the part.

Clint

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2014, 01:24:05 PM »
I might get a quote from my local black smith, and see what he says.

Mike Seller

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2014, 08:56:36 AM »
Clint - If you go with your local blacksmith make certain marine quality stainless steel is used and that any welding is up to scratch as this will be the weakest point.

Suggest you try Sailspar in Colchester who are mast/boom manufacturers who also make steel fabrications to customer requirements which should include tabernacles. Contact email office@sailspar.co.uk

Mike. 

Andy Wiltshire

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2014, 10:26:09 PM »

I appreciate that this topic is a little old, but we have a recently manufactured stainless steel tabernacle fitted to our West Coast 16 "Ratty".

This was already fitted to the WC when we bought it. I have attached a picture should it be of interest.


Clint

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2014, 04:38:13 AM »
This is what I got in the end, I made one out of wood but was not entirely happy, I was slightly concerned about stress on the wood.
I found this tabernacle at a boat jumble and it cost 80.00. It is very slightly to big, so I will have to pack out the mast so that it fits, and figure out a way to mount it to the boat too.
How much did yours cost to fabricate Andy?
« Last Edit: October 23, 2014, 04:40:10 AM by Clint »

Mike Seller

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2014, 09:40:59 PM »
Clint - That looks like a bargain purchase and a very suitable piece of kit for a Winklebrig. You say that you will need to pack out the mast but would it not be best to fix the packing on the inside of the tabernacle plus put back  support wedges on the outside edges so that the tabernacle fits snuggly into the cabin rooftop moulding - I suggest this for two reasons. you will need to bolt the tabernacle through the rear so that the bolts marry up with the existing fixing holes and the inside timber which strenghtens the coachroof. I would not bolt the new tabernacle to the deck as this flexes under strain and can easily crack.
If you adopt this suggestion I'm sure that you can work out  to somehow bolt or screw the new packing onto the new metal tabernacle.
Recently my original wooden tabernacle split. In the end the split was re glued and I had two stainless steel plates made up to the shape of the outside edges of the tabernacle which were glued and screwed onto the wood.

Clint

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2014, 11:20:12 AM »
Mike, the support wedges are safely in the work shop and waiting reinstallation. I bought the tabernacle without measuring it. I thought packing the mast out would be an easier solution than trying to epoxy wood onto brass. When I bought the tabernacle it was one of those if it looks right, it is right moments. I will try to use all the original fixing points, the only thing that concerns me is the base of the brass tabernacle. It is perfectly level, and as you know the coach roof has a slight arch. If you or anyone else has a good solution to this l would be very greatfull. I don't really want to pack it with wood. Sikaflex might be an expensive option.

Andy Wiltshire

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2014, 09:03:32 PM »
Hello Clint.

It was already fitted to the WC when we bought it. I'm aware that the previous owner spent quite a bit on various stainless fittings.

Regarding the curvature on the base, the base on this one was shaped by way of a large press. Another way to do it would be to use a thicker stainless base plate and then shape the underside with an angle grinder. It may take some time and I would use the flap discs (40 grade).

I would be tempted to shape another base plate in this fashion and then get a fabricator to run some TIG welds around this placing it underneath your new tabernacle.

Mike Seller

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Re: Tabernacle
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2014, 02:31:01 PM »
Clint - looking at your photograph again the new tabernacle appears to sit well on the deck. I assume any curvature in this area is very slight. I was down on my boat yesterday and although I could not check how flat this section was by using a straight edge it looked flat to my eye. If however you have a slight gap along the edges or minor high spots then surely by applying a suitable sealant on the base of the tabernacle this would suffice. Regarding cost, Force 4 have a range of sikaflex sealants/caulking from between 8 to 20 per cartridge.
On reflection your idea of packing out by increasing the dimensions of the mast at its base seems the simplest solution. I assume the thickness of packing needed will allow you to screw/glue the wood to the mast. If the thicknesses are relatively small maybe stainless steel sheet could be used on the mast instead. Again looking at your photograph there appears to be another problem with the positions of the existing fixing holes through the coachroof as the new tabernacle has decorative holes at the back which might be another headache for you when deciding how to fix the tabernacle into position.