Author Topic: Jaws and spars  (Read 1842 times)

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Jaws and spars
« on: April 06, 2014, 10:30:02 AM »
jeff@stjohnsegham.com
   
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 01:25 pm:      
Can anyone recommend someone to make a new set of jaws for the boom and gaff? I had a new pair made a year ago by Lakeland Wooden Boats (along with a new Tabernacle). However I have had two jaw breakages since then and I'm not sure that it will survive yet another epoxy and brass screw repair, so I would like to have a new, stronger set as replacements.

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2014, 10:30:16 AM »
Martin Cartwright
   
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 02:19 pm:      
After several breakages myself,I asked Classic Marine in Woodbridge to make me some in bronze.I am delighted with the results. Not only do they work much better than the original wooden ones but look better as well.If you contact Classic Marine, speak to Moray and mention the ones he did for me. (That way you will not need to give him all the dimensions again).

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2014, 10:30:31 AM »
Roger Parish
   
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 04:46 pm:      
Jeff would be interested to hear more about the rig on your boat. Is the boom and gaff arm in alloy like the mast. Presumably much lighter? Do you need a kicker to keep the boom down?
What other variations are there over the earlier models?

Martin are you going to tell us how much these classic fittings cost?

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2014, 10:30:47 AM »
Roger Parish
   
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 04:58 pm:      
The tabernacle on my boat broke when I was raising the mast two years ago. The wind blew the mast to one side and the tabernacle split into three pieces. Not surprising when you think about it as there is a weak point where the fixing holes are.The pieces were later epoxied together and the inside reinforced with glass tape and epoxy. However it can be made much stronger by fitting a plate across the base and thus making it into a box structure. I used a brass plate screwed and glued to the base. It will require the bottom of the tabernacle to be reduced by the thickness of the plate used and a bit shaved off the bottom of the mast.

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2014, 10:31:03 AM »
Martin Cartwright
   
Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2007 - 03:36 pm:      
1. Sorry.I am assuming all masts and spars are timber.(I forgot there are some alloy ones).
2. Not cheap I'm afraid. (But then who wants a cheap looking boat!). The price depends on exactly what you require (I needed longer than standard bronze spar end pieces to cover the extensive damage caused by the failure of the wooden jaws- plus one or two other variations). However, prices for each element are on www.classicmarine.co.uk.and you can mix and match.
3. I think the original tabernackle is a weakness. I replaced mine after a similar accident and reinforced the joints internally with screwed stainless angles.

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2014, 10:31:18 AM »
Jeff Wattley
   
Posted on Friday, July 20, 2007 - 08:50 am:      
Hello Martin and Roger

Apologies for my slow response. I'd like to say I'd been too busy sailing but that would not be true! Just too busy. My boat (No. 112) has alloy boom, gaff and mast but each has wooden end sections. Thus they are all pretty light, but not so much as to need a kicker. My tabernacle was also broken when I bought the boat and I had a new one made but it is a weak point. Thanks for the details of the Classic Marine bronze jaws.

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2014, 10:31:32 AM »
Geoffrey Osborn
   
Posted on Thursday, September 20, 2007 - 12:20 pm:      
Boom jaws.
I cracked mine by sheeting in after lowering the mainsail on a run. Repair was straightforward. Prevention? Have a 'spinnaker eye/loop' fitted to fwd side of mast, little bit of line will hold boom jaws above jaw support on tabernacle. Take the line off if you wish to pole out the jib/set a spinnaker.

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2014, 10:31:52 AM »
Julian Swindell
Username: Julian_swindell

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Friday, September 21, 2007 - 09:29 am:      
I have had great trouble with the problem of the boom jaws dropping below the little jaw support cheeks on the mast. Usually happens when I try to reef and don't notice the boom has swung out and slipped down. I was thinking of investing in a proper bronze/galvanised gooseneck and mast band for next year. Has anyone done this and are there any significant problems (apart from cost!)

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Re: Jaws and spars
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2014, 10:32:08 AM »
Roger Parish
   
Posted on Friday, September 21, 2007 - 08:15 pm:      
I can see no problem of using a metal gooseneck fitting. You would have less flexibility to vary the height of boom although a traditional twin mastband fixing gives some adjustment.
I have never experienced the problem of the mast dropping below the jaw supports. This brings us to another topic of " how do you reef?" I would always hove-to and sheet the main in to be able to reach the sail ties which would prevent the boom dropping. There is a seamanship series of articles currently running in Classic Boat and they talk about sailing off the wind to put a reef in. This method means that both sails are driving and the boom is out and out of reach, not a method I would want to try. I think MG and Cunliffe both advocate hoving to.