Author Topic: Electric outboards  (Read 8925 times)

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2014, 07:41:56 AM »

George Billington
Username: George_billington

Registered: 12-2009
   
Posted on Wednesday, February 02, 2011 - 10:41 am:      
I'd be sceptical about the ability to keep the battery fully charged. Where would you put the panel on a WB It's enormous. I asked an Electrician friend of mine, who is an authorised solar panel installer, and he tells me that panels producing 12 volts generate about 500watts per square metre, and the panel needs to be at 90 degrees to the sun to work at its most efficient. What they didn't say is where the battery is - it looks to be under the top cover. If so it solves the weight problem but would a five hour recharge be acceptable?

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2014, 07:42:13 AM »

Martin_cartwright
Username: Martin_cartwright

Registered: 04-2008
   
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2011 - 06:46 pm:      
I agree.The solar panel is unlikely to be satisfactory on a Winklebrig in this country. How about a wind generator to keep the battery topped up? (They are about the same price as the solar panel). This would have the added advantage of charging as you tow to and from the launch site. I have never seen one on a boat behind a car, but you would charge up pretty quickly! Would it be legal?

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2014, 07:42:32 AM »

Barend Nieuwendijk
Username: Barend_nieuwendijk

Registered: 08-2008
   
Posted on Monday, February 21, 2011 - 10:46 pm:      
The idea sounds nice (an wind generator powered by the towing car) but is not as efficient as the generator in your car. You can very easily connect the power circuit form your car your to the boat’s battery. The dynamo of your car can possibly charge about 40 ah. So two hours driving can recharge an 80 ah battery.

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #33 on: April 06, 2014, 07:42:51 AM »

Brian Goodbourn
Username: Brian_goodbourn

Registered: 01-2009
   
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2011 - 12:54 pm:      
Hi

I have a Torqueedo 801 which is the previous model to the solar charge (trickle) one that has rcently been released. The unit is quite powerful and can push my boat along quite comfortably though I use a 4hp normally.....the motor mount would need to modified to fit it permanently as the battery sits back quite away and fouls on the transom.
Good points:
- Folds up and is quite light
- No Fuel smells and spills
- Very quiet
- Battery will run for 2 to 4 hours dependent on use
- The battery is a new generation Lithium type and holds the charge very well.....I used it in October and didn't charge it all winter and she was still 80% charged last week when I used it.

The reason I bought it is that my little Honda air-cooled was stolen from my sailing club and it didn't like travelling in my car......so it seemed the next natural step.
What's more because it folds I can take it on my scooter and park up anywhere when it's busy at the club...

The down side is that it is expensive and salt water and electrics seem a strange mixture(though no issue so far)

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #34 on: April 06, 2014, 07:43:13 AM »

Barend Nieuwendijk
Username: Barend_nieuwendijk

Registered: 08-2008
   
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2012 - 09:44 pm:      
Hi,
With the new season ahead I would like to share with you my experiences from last year.
As you maybe remember, I changed my outboard for an electric propulsion (2,5 kw which equals about 6 hp). With battery power (230 ah , 24 volt, weight 130 kg, the motor-sailing time is 9 – 10 hours with 2,5 – 3 knots, maximum speed = hull speed for 2,5 hours), 30 ah battery charger aboard)

We made several trips in the Dutch waters (canals and lakes) in the north and mid Netherlands.
Our Frisian lakes are about the same as the Norfolk broads but then bigger and wider, but no current. The trips were one week an several weekends.
In our sailing waters you find a lot of villages, small harbours and many places where you can moor, anker or berth. In almost every harbour you will find an power outlet

Well: it was superb. The absent of motor noise, the ease of use, no smell.
Because most of the time we had sail-power, we had no worries about charging of the battery. Some distances we had to motor a canal against strong winds. The power of the motor was sufficient.
Because I felt that the standard delivered propeller was not the right one I have changed it this winter with a Torqeeudo propeller because of its superb performance.

The battery capacity is enough for several days sailing and as I told, charging the batteries was no problem because everywhere you can find an power outlet. Of course I was worried in the beginning: would I have enough power (in worst circumstances) to reach the harbour? But I am used to the power consumption now. No worries anymore.
Because I keep my Winkle Brig always on the trailer after sailing trips, charging afterwards is never a problem.

Because of the extra weight of the batteries, which I positioned in the porta potty’s place, I was afraid the Winkle Brig would be a bit out of balance. But she is not. The boat is much more stable and I do not think she has lost much speed. I closed the well and replaced it with two discharges (is that the right word??) I have no problems with incoming water.

Are there disadvantages with the electric motoring? Yes, there are.
When sailing with force 5 or more, the propeller starts turning around and you can hear some noise of the freewheeling motor. I cannot remember if my outboard did the same…..

And the other disadvantage: discharged batteries. In circumstances where you cannot charge regular or easily your batteries, electric propulsion is not the right thing. The use of solar cells does not help. 1 square meter cell gives you with good sunlight about 0,8 kwh per day. So in my case and with half discharged batteries you need about 2,5 days sunlight for charging.

Although it sounds a bit ridiculous, I am working on an hybrid system. It means that for long trips on waterways with no harbours or no power-outlets –or trips with the risk of empty batteries - I will use an small light-weighted generator. The generator will be packed in a noise-reduction case. The principle is that you use it as an additional power source.
For that I will use an small Yamaha 4-takt generator. This generates enough power to keep me going on cruise-speed. Because it is 4-takt it is possible to reduce the noise to almost quiet.
Most of the time I will not need the generator.

Will be continued.

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #35 on: April 06, 2014, 07:43:29 AM »

Martin_cartwright
Username: Martin_cartwright

Registered: 04-2008
   
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 08:14 am:      
Very interestd in your trials Barend. Well done!
I am sure the hybrid system is the way to go and since my first post on this subject three years ago motors,batteries, and inverter generators have developed in leaps and bounds. I still like the idea of diesel electric. Keep up the good work and in a year or two when it is time to change my Tohatsu 6hp I will come and visit!

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2014, 07:43:48 AM »

Barend Nieuwendijk
Username: Barend_nieuwendijk

Registered: 08-2008
   
Posted on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 - 09:49 pm:      
Hi Martin,
We have in mind to go to the Broads one of these years. When it comes to that, I will send you an message.

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #37 on: April 06, 2014, 07:44:06 AM »

Vipula De Silva
Username: Vipula_de_silva

Registered: 07-2011
   
Posted on Saturday, September 08, 2012 - 01:27 am:      
Been a little while since anyone posted about this topic. I've also been tempted by the Torqueedo 1003 for Annie Elizabeth. Seems well suite to the broads. Has anyone tried one of these yet?

Brian, if you are still reading, can you update on how the travel 801 has performed? What mods did you have to do to get it mounted in the well please?

Anyone try any other electric motors?

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2014, 07:44:22 AM »

Martin_cartwright
Username: Martin_cartwright

Registered: 04-2008
   
Posted on Saturday, October 06, 2012 - 09:42 am:      
Barend:- Have you looked into fuel cell technology instead of a diesel or petrol generator hybrid?
I came across this recently:- http://fuelcells.caravanmoversonline.co.uk/efoy/products/600.html

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #39 on: April 06, 2014, 07:44:44 AM »

Brian Goodbourn
Username: Brian_goodbourn

Registered: 01-2009
   
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2012 - 05:04 pm:      
Hi

I've not done much sailing this year! Sadly Patience was blown off her mooring and ended on the sea wall during a storm.

The season has been punctuated with getting quotes and someone to fix her up......good news is that work is finally underway so I hope to be sailing next season ! Thinking of the Broads for a maiden voyage.

VROUW KIRSTEN

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Torqueedo Electric outboards
« Reply #40 on: June 21, 2016, 09:11:16 AM »
Because of legal restrictions using fuel engines on lakes I want to replace my 6 PC mariner by a Torqueedo 1003S. Adding a second Batterie pack I believe I have enough electric power for all "normal" situations.  ::)

I have readed the last posts of this thread, the last two years no additional experiences were posted. Does anyone have made additional trips with a electrical outboard, especially the Torqueedo system? I do not expect  a motorboat characteristic and I feel comfortable with the absence of fuel or noise at my boat.  8)

I will be for one week at the Schlei and Flensburger Förde. This will be my testing period for the alternative electrical outboard System, I will report.

Gerold


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Martin

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Re: Electric outboards
« Reply #41 on: June 23, 2016, 08:38:43 PM »
Hello Gerold
I purchased a Torqeedo 1003S two years ago as an auxillary and for use on my inflatable dinghy. I keep it on a transom bracket when sailing and in the cabin for security when not. It is very easily stolen!
I did wire in the remote control as reaching the Torqeedo's tiller is a bit of a stretch, but this packed up within a year so I have abandoned it. I think the sunlight affects the electronics.
I sail nearly all the time on tidal/coastal waters and I would not like to have it as my sole means of propulsion, but its weight, cleanliness (no grease or fuel to spill in the cabin) and power make it a wonderful 'get-you-home' to have on board for peace of mind.
I don't think you will be dissapointed with its power, but I would say that even with two batteries you may find the range limiting. I understand that you can charge the Torqeedo battery from another battery so you could carry a large leisure battery to charge from if you are going to be away from mains power for any time.
Let us know how you get on.

VROUW KIRSTEN

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« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2016, 05:32:33 PM »
Hello Martin,

I have purchased the Torqueedo 1003S, but had to find out space between the motor bracket and the boat is too short. So I decided to manufacture a stainless steel trough and build into the inner stern side. It fits very well.

For those who want to use the Torqueedo too or have similar problems I add the constructional drawing for replication. I will add a photo of the installation later.

Kind regards


Gerold
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 05:37:33 PM by VROUW KIRSTEN »
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VROUW KIRSTEN

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Some days with the Torqueedo 1003S
« Reply #43 on: July 23, 2016, 05:58:02 PM »
Hello,

as I wrote I have installed the Torqueedo and made some trips with the new equipment.

First of all, it is important to become familiar with the motor handling reading the manual and exercise all functions and the effects to the boat before gravely situations happens.

I didn´t -as a result I have to repair a hole at the bow  :(

But, the motor is a efficient propulsion for my WB. Against 4 Bft. (at a lake, with fetch of app. 4 km) the WB runs with app. 4 knots, the motor would last 45 min as the motor display says.

Sound of the motor, especially at full speed, is like a turbine, but at normal conditions, today at 2-3 Bft., it runs at 20 to 30 % power and it is ok. Definitly a combustion engine will be much more distinctly.

If the boat is sailing and the motor is still in in position, the screw begins to rotate by the flow. This begins at a speed of app. 4 km/h. I decided to remove the motor if I want to sail only.

This year I will stay at the Duemmer Lake only, next year Northsea and Baltic Sea (coastal areas) will be my testing area.

I`ve added photos of installation space of Torqueedo.

Kind regards

Gerold

« Last Edit: August 01, 2016, 11:07:31 AM by VROUW KIRSTEN »
Life is too short to drink poor wine, waste time with boring people and to be far away from the sea!

VROUW KIRSTEN

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Torqueedo in different situations
« Reply #44 on: April 18, 2017, 08:09:45 AM »
Hello,

in 2016 I was very satisfied with the power of my Torqueedo at each situation. But, to be honest, on a lake of app. 38 sq km  are not so many difficult situations.

This year I launched the WB 120 at strong wind of 5 to 6 Beaufort, squalls up to 7 Beaufort. I had to transfer the boat leaving one small cove against the wind, app. 400 m parallel to the wind and at least back into another cove with tailwind.  It was a distance of app. 1 km with remarkable waves and the boat danced in a vivacious manner  ;D

The Torqueedo worked full power and gave for the distance 10% of battery charge. I could control the boats movement direction safely all the time.

Gerold
Life is too short to drink poor wine, waste time with boring people and to be far away from the sea!