The Winklebrig Forum

Using the boat => Miscellaneous => Topic started by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:44:38 AM

Title: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:44:38 AM
Neville_holmes
Username: Neville_holmes

Registered: 10-2012
   
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 04:32 pm:      
Does anyone sleep while aflote in a WB?
So who has spent the longest number of consecutive nights on a WB?
Anyone sleep on 'the hook' of only in a marina?
I used to sleep on my 26' heavy yacht on the mooring with mixed success. So while looking for a WB I would like to know if sleeping while on a cruise is practical.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:44:58 AM

Martin_cartwright
Username: Martin_cartwright

Registered: 04-2008
   
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 08:23 pm:      
Absolutely no problem at all.
2 weeks is my maximum (on the hook, behind the car - enroute, and in marinas), but this maximum is only limited by my length of holiday.

At anchor is my preference. As Winklebrigs are so light, there is an awful lot of bumping and squeaking on a pontoon whereas with a large anchor and plenty of chain you are very secure at anchor - and the serenity of drying out in a deserted estuary in a gale is a luxury big yacht owners can only dream about!
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:45:16 AM
David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2012 - 08:25 pm:      
Hi Neville,

The most we have done on Markie is ten consecutive nights, six in Torquay Marina followed by four just up the road on the Grand Western Canal. Two adults and a dog, nice and cosy. We have also done seven consecutive nights whilst cruising the Caledonian Canal.
Never mind the number of consecutive nights, how about three adults, one youngster and a 12 week old baby sharing a WB for several nights!
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:45:34 AM
Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2012 - 06:48 pm:      
Hi Neville,

Welcome to the WB world of which I am a recent owner having purchased "Heligan" a few months ago. I am currently upgrading the cabin with the view of spending as many nights aboard as possible when cruising next year. So far I have only spent a few afternoons napping down below whilst the boat sits on her trailer in my drive but found the accommodation very comfortable!
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:45:49 AM

David_owens
Username: David_owens

Registered: 04-2010
   
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 10:49 pm:      
Hi Neville, I have an unmodified cabin (please advise Mike Seller of your proposed alterations!), and sleep out regularly on her, on a pontoon. Must be sheltered because I don't suffer much noise apart from the rigging of other boats,but then I do avoid very bad weather. I've also slept out several times 'on the hook' including as stay at Ridgewharfe marina, Wareham for several days.
I love it. As an ex-backpacker and camper the accommodation is commodious, dry and cosy. My boat lacks the original gas cooker, but as I have a sprayhood I simply cook using the inexpensive single burner gas cookers available everywhere, in the shelter of that. I have a boom tent but never had the need to use it.
For me, sleeping onboard is one of the Winklebrig's greatest assets, far superior to the larger Cornish Shrimper.
This is no doubt aided by a nightcap or two of Pussers Rum, or a good malt ...
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:46:07 AM
Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2012 - 06:10 pm:      
Hi Neville,

My boat came with the basic cabin specification which is of course ample for most sailors. However with cruising in mind I wanted a tidy,attractive and comfortable space without being too elaborate given the size!
I've made up wooden holders from 6mm ply fixed to the bulkhead either side of the companionway to store charts,books and binoculars etc at a fraction of the price you would have to spend on the teak holders advertised by the chandlers. I have an oil lamp hanging alongside. Either side of the cabin,level with the portholes, I have made up lockers and shelves which continue down to the stem above the "V" berth with a "V" shaped locker where the two meet.
I am also making up a unit which sits between the portside quarter berth and "V" berth to house a removeable plastic sink/spirit stove with two drawers below. One for cutlery etc and the second for navigation aids,torch etc. The unit will be finished off with a removeable top to double up as a worktop or navigation table. I have made a table that can either be used inside the cabin or cockpit for meals and stored away when not required. I am currently wiring for navigation lights and power below for a berth light and sockets to use mobile phone,handheld GPS etc.

As you say the accommodation is commodious and having slept on board many different boats of all sizes the Winklebrig is up with the rest. I reckon it is down to the conditions and where you choose to drop the hook or tie up.

When finished I will offer up some photographs.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:46:23 AM

Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2012 - 07:29 pm:      
Hi David,

When my wife read the above she pointed out that I had addressed the posting to Neville and not yourself - my apologies! Either a lack of concentration, senior moment or the large Gin and T that I had poured is to blame.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:46:36 AM
David_owens
Username: David_owens

Registered: 04-2010
   
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2012 - 09:34 pm:      
The G&T excuses all. Really looking forward to the pics in due course. There have been some lovely cabin modifications - to wit, Partan (WB No 48). But your sounds particularly extensive.

Good luck!
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:46:53 AM
Paul Thomas
Username: Paul_thomas

Registered: 01-2011
   
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2012 - 11:07 am:      
Hi,
I have found the accommodation on Partan, using the boom tent, to be more than ample for two adults so long as each is a little considerate. There is plenty of stowage space and cooking is straightforward even using the single burner spirit stove, although I take an additional camping stove to use ashore for convenience. I have slept on the trailer in a layby on the way to Norfolk but confess that access is not great with the mast down and other disturbances kept me awake. The best nights have been on a mudweight close into the reedbeds on Barton Broad with a hurricane lantern hanging from the end of the boom, which incidentally helps keep bugs out of the cabin. As David says, the cabin seems luxurious after years of using a backpacking tent. Using the boom tent lets me leave the hatch open even if it is raining, which enables me to stand up to dress, the extra privacy is useful too for using the loo! Overall I would rate the WB as more comfortable than being on a large charter yacht with 6 or 7 other people. Although the altered layout restricts me to 2 adults, I can see it would be fun for young kids as well with the forward V berth in situ. My daughter is a little young to really be useful but loves being on board the WB.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:47:09 AM

Roger Parish
Username: Roger_parish

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2012 - 08:10 pm:      
Hi Paul
Glad to hear that you are enjoying your adventures on Partan. Cynthia and I miss her very much and I have now sold the day boat that replaced Partan and looking for a larger boat that we can leave on the Norfolk Broads.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:49:08 AM

Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 06:56 pm:      
Hello All,

Going to have a go at uploading some pictures showing improvements I have made to Heligan's cabin - here goes.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:49:25 AM
Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 08:13 pm:      
Hello again,
This not going to work - I need to find a teenager to do this for me! In the meantime I can always send the pictures via email
mikeseller@hotmail.co.uk for anybody interested.
Regards,
Mike.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:49:44 AM

David Cawston
Username: David_cawston

Registered: 03-2007
   
Posted on Friday, May 10, 2013 - 06:01 pm:      
Hi Mike, Have you modified the ribs that the pine lining planks are attached to, on Markie the ribs appear to be made of something like rolled up newspaper tubes laminated on to the hull whereas Heligan appears to have rectangular section wood? laminated to the hull, is that so? I have had to wedge a few match sticks into the screw holes as the screws easily pull out.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:49:59 AM

David_bone
Username: David_bone

Registered: 07-2012
   
Posted on Sunday, May 12, 2013 - 02:42 pm:      
'Heligan's" interior appears the same as mine, (WB107) a one piece moulding extending from sheer to sheer, stem to after lockers, secured by bolts at 6 inch spacing around the sheer.
Excellent for tidiness, cleanliness and eliminating condensation but what goes on behind is unknown and access to the exterior shell, challenging.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:50:12 AM
Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Sunday, May 12, 2013 - 05:35 pm:      
Hello Mr Cawston and Mr Bone,

The ribs are part of the hull and appear to be a single moulding. The planks are fixed with self tappers and luckily all screws are tight. I suppose if they work loose in time the holes could be filled and re-drilled or larger screws used. Pity I could not get the other photos on the screen and at the correct size - I may ask one of the administrators to tidy up the mess I have left. On the photo you have seen the hinged lid to the worktop/nav table lifts to access the spirit stove and plastic wash bowl. The bowl lifts out to a large storage area below.

I'm off creek crawling around Salcombe next week and planning to sleep onboard.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:50:28 AM

Paul Thomas
Username: Paul_thomas

Registered: 01-2011
   
Posted on Tuesday, February 04, 2014 - 12:40 pm:      
Hi Mike, I am keen to visit the Salcombe estuary. Would you mind sharing details of where you launched and then parked your car and trailer with approx cost. Kingsbridge looks best bet.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Old Forum on April 13, 2014, 07:50:41 AM
Mike_seller
Username: Mike_seller

Registered: 06-2012
   
Posted on Wednesday, February 05, 2014 - 11:16 am:      
Hi Paul,
I chose Salcombe as Kingsbridge is only accessible 2.5 hrs either side of high water. I did however sail up to Kingsbridge for lunch.
The Salcombe slipway is at Batson Creek with boat/vehicle cark park and a secure trailer compound. The area has night security. Car park charges are high and unless you pay up front you have to keep returning to feed the meter. Free parking on the roads away from the centre. My visit was for 4 days and the harbour dues,car park and trailer storage came to 63. The Harbour Master did not charge me extra for mooring - one night on the hook and two nights on a visitors buoy at the top end of Southpool Creek. Water taxi available to take you ashore. At the top of this creek is the village of Southpool with a great pub to visit - watch the tide. Salcombe town is expensive to eat but the YC is good value plus showers. More info on boatlaunch.co.uk or the LA's website Southams.gov.uk/harbour dues
The boatpark attendant is really helpful. Avoid the main holiday season as it gets very busy. On entering the town don't miss the sign to the boatpark - you will end up in narrow one way streets. WB97 Bumble Bee is on her residents mooring at the start of Batson Creek.
A lovely estuary and away from the hub a quiet backwater.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Paul Thomas on August 18, 2014, 07:41:52 PM
As a further answer to the original question, we have just completed an 11 day cruise on Partan.  2 adults and 1 child slept on board every night, and we're still talking.  The availability of showers and cooked meals on the Broads certainly made life easier.  The boom tent that came with the boat has sadly worn out so we made do with a 3.99 tarp from Proper Job and some bungees.  If any one knows how to weld/glue cheap plastic tarps I reckon I could make a new fitted tent for about a fiver.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Gwilym on October 09, 2014, 06:14:58 PM
7 consecutive nights this summer about 10 last year . All on lough Derg  in Ireland and the Shannon . Very comfy for myself and wife and even had our grandson with us a couple of times. But has anyone sorted a double berth?
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Mike Seller on October 10, 2014, 10:14:32 AM
Firstly Gwilym congratulations on winning the PBO Miles to Maldon trophy as seen in the latest issue of Practical Boat Owner. Good to see a photograph of you and Eva aboard "Constance." Such a pity that Peter Poland did not mention a winklebrig in his article on small second hand cruisers last month.

Like you I have spent some very comfortable nights aboard this summer thanks to the double berth in the forepeak and keeping things very tidy and stowed away down below! The original information for this boat describes this as a one and a half person berth however I have found it roomy enough for two - the only problem is getting in and out of this space when two wish to share. I take it "Constance" came with the ply wood sheet support that fits between the two bilge board casings and the spare cushion which sits on top converting the space into a wider/longer bunk. If so and still not adequate then I suppose with a little thought and DIY a larger ply sheet could be inserted.

Regards,

Mike. (No: 95)
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Gwilym on October 18, 2014, 10:55:02 AM
This is encouraging. I will try out next time we are on board. I do have the extra sheet of ply. We tend to, immediately we are on board fill the peak up with all our luggage. Which to be honest make the boat look very untidy and has prevented us giving the forward berth a proper chance. As you know, if you have seen the article in PBO, that we trailed back from Lough Derg and the Shannon a fantastic cruising area for Winkle brigs.....perhaps I should write it up on the forum.


Thanks .  Gum
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Paul Thomas on January 04, 2015, 12:07:47 AM
Hi Gwilym,

I would be very interested in any info you can provide about Lough Derg.  Having recently read an article by Colin Henwood in Watercraft, it sounds a perfect destination for a WB.
Title: Re: Sleeping on board?
Post by: Gwilym on March 09, 2015, 12:12:12 PM
Sorry I missed this reply to my original note.

Lough Derg is a great place to sail. Free or very cheap marinas and harbours. Lots to do and see especially if you have a base and use a car. Its part of the River Shannon navigable waterway so you can go as far as you like. Stunning countryside all round the Lough. Great live trad music sessions in lots of places. Take your fiddle or whatever you will be welcome to join in or sing a song. We had a great night with a crowns of Irish motorboat's in a pub in Terryglass. Started about 11.00pm and went on into the early hours.

Good facilities in many places provided by Irish Waterways and accessed by keycard. Toilets are free but you pay for showers and clothes washing facilities. All the boaters, mostly motorboats, are very friendly. If you are into trout or Pike fishing there is quite a bit of that.